Volume 3, Issue 3, September 2020, Page: 78-90
Assessing the Performance of the Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC) 2001-2020: Another Failed Dream
Kaniye Samuel Adheledhini Ebeku, Faculty of Law, University of Port Harcourt, Choba, Rivers State, Nigeria
Received: Jan. 18, 2020;       Accepted: Mar. 11, 2020;       Published: Jun. 9, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijls.20200303.11      View  206      Downloads  98
Abstract
The Niger Delta region of Nigeria is of critical importance to the country because of its oil revenues. Noteworthy, it is also strategic to the international community because of its significant contribution to world supply of oil; such that any shortage of oil supply from the region invariably causes increases in international oil prices. From the 1970s to date oil revenues derived from the Niger Delta region have been used to develop other parts of Nigeria, while the region has been left underdeveloped. This contradiction led to protests by the people of the region, which led to the establishment of the Oil Minerals Producing Areas Development Commission (OMPADEC) in 1992. The dream of OMPADEC was the transformation of the Niger Delta region from the state of poverty and underdevelopment to a prosperous society equipped with modern facilities and infrastructure. However, that dream failed due to several factors, including corruption and poor project execution. This disappointment generated intensified protests by the people of the region, leading to the establishment of the Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC) in 2000 with the same mandate as OMPADEC. Many scholars have suggested that the NDDC has failed. This article assesses this suggestion and concludes that the NDDC is another failed dream. To succeed, appropriate recommendations are made towards reformation of the Commission for effective performance.
Keywords
Nigeria, Niger Delta Region, Oil Revenue, Poverty, Underdevelopment, Resource Control, Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC)
To cite this article
Kaniye Samuel Adheledhini Ebeku, Assessing the Performance of the Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC) 2001-2020: Another Failed Dream, International Journal of Law and Society. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2020, pp. 78-90. doi: 10.11648/j.ijls.20200303.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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